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Emotional regulation in betting

Emotional regulation in betting

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Emotional regulation in betting -

Read Bet Review Visit Sportsbook. Read Caesars Review Visit Sportsbook. Key Psychological Factors in Sports Betting The psychology of sports betting involves a series of complex mental processes that impact our choices. Understanding Risk Perception In the realm of sports betting, risk perception stands as a fundamental pillar of the psychological landscape.

Cognitive Biases in Sports Betting Within the arena of sports betting, the human mind can be both a sharp tool and a cunning trickster. Bankroll Management In the dynamic realm of sports betting, the concept of bankroll management stands as a beacon of rationality amidst the tempest of chance.

Claim offer. Behavioral Patterns and Betting Habits Brain activity plays a pivotal role in shaping our behavioral patterns and betting habits.

Addiction and Problem Gambling While sports betting offers an avenue for entertainment and strategic engagement, a subset of individuals can find themselves entangled in the web of problematic behavior.

Statistical Predictors and Factors for Gambling Problems Gambling addiction is a complex and multifaceted behavioral condition that can have far-reaching consequences. Biological Factors: Emerging research suggests that genetic predisposition can play a role in gambling addiction.

Individuals with a family history of addiction disorders, including gambling, may be more susceptible due to underlying genetic vulnerabilities. In some cases, certain individuals may have altered dopamine pathways, making them more susceptible to the rush of excitement and pleasure associated with gambling.

Psychological Drivers: Psychological factors, such as low self-esteem, anxiety, depression and other forms of psychological distress, can contribute to gambling addiction. Gambling may offer a temporary escape from negative emotions or a way to boost self-esteem through perceived success, creating a cycle of reinforcement.

Socioeconomic Status: Socioeconomic status factors, such as financial instability or a desire for quick monetary gains, can influence the development of gambling addiction. Individuals facing economic hardship may see different forms of gambling as a potential solution to their financial woes and this motivation might cause them to form pathological gambling problems.

These biases can lead to unrealistic beliefs about the predictability of gambling events, further fueling addictive behavior. Social Influence: Peer pressure and social circles can play a significant role in gambling addiction. The normalization of gambling within a social group can facilitate its acceptance and escalation.

Instant Gratification: The instantaneous nature of gambling outcomes, particularly in modern online platforms, provides instant gratification. This rapid feedback loop can lead to a heightened sense of excitement and impulsivity, reinforcing addictive behavior. This reliance on gambling as a means of emotional regulation can escalate into addiction.

Co-Occurring Disorders: Gambling addiction often coexists with other mental health disorders, such as substance abuse, mood disorders or impulse control disorders, creating a complex web of challenges.

Reinforcement Mechanisms: The intermittent nature of rewards in gambling, known as variable reinforcement, is particularly potent in fostering addictive behavior. The occasional big win, even amidst numerous losses, keeps individuals engaged in the hope of future successes.

Chasing Losses In the intricate realm of sports betting, chasing losses emerges as a formidable adversary to sound decision-making.

Understanding Superstitions and Biases Superstitions and biases, though seemingly irrational, wield a surprising influence within the realm of sports betting. Did you know? At BetRivers, diversity isn't just a buzzword; it's at the core of their expansive scope of betting markets and competitive odds.

Read BetRivers Review Visit Sportsbook. Here are practical tips that will empower you to leverage the insights gained: Emotional Self-Regulation: Mastering emotional control is the linchpin of successful betting.

Recognize the ebb and flow of emotions and practice mindfulness techniques to prevent impulsive decisions driven by momentary sentiments.

Embrace losses as part of the journey and maintain a steady mindset irrespective of outcomes. Understanding Odds: Grasp the language of odds to extract meaningful insights from numbers. Know how odds represent probabilities and potential payouts.

This understanding aids in gauging the perceived risk and reward of each wager, helping you make informed decisions aligned with risk perception. Refine Decision-Making: Enhance your decision-making by integrating cognitive biases awareness.

Regularly question your thought processes, challenging biases that may sway your choices. Engage in objective analysis, evaluating the information available and avoiding snap judgments. Cognitive Reappraisal: Embrace cognitive reappraisal—a strategy that involves reinterpreting situations—to temper emotional responses.

When facing losses or unexpected outcomes, reframe the situation as a learning opportunity rather than a setback. This mental shift prevents emotional overreactions. Affect Regulation: Develop affect regulation strategies to manage emotions effectively.

Channel negative emotions, like frustration, into constructive actions. Engage in physical activities or take breaks to restore emotional equilibrium before making decisions. Strategic Patience: Recognize that consistent success in sports betting requires patience.

Avoid the allure of chasing losses or pursuing rapid gains. Cultivate a long-term perspective, allowing your strategy to evolve and adapt over time. Analytical Record-Keeping: Maintain a meticulous record of your bets and outcomes.

Analyze both wins and losses to identify patterns and areas for improvement. An objective review of your past decisions provides valuable insights for refining your strategy.

Risk-Adjusted Approach: Apply risk-adjusted thinking to each bet. Calculate the potential risk and reward for each wager and weigh them against one another. Prioritize bets that offer favorable risk-reward ratios to enhance your overall profitability. Continuous Learning: Sports betting is a dynamic field; stay updated with relevant trends and insights.

Engage with betting communities, read expert analyses and continuously expand your knowledge to refine your approach.

Bankroll Discipline: Implement effective bankroll management techniques. Avoid impulsive decisions driven by fluctuations in fortune, ensuring consistent and sustainable betting. More Sports Betting Resources. State by state betting.

Welcome to our detailed guide to the best online sportsbooks in the United States. state betting guide. Oddstrader University. Sharpen your skills as a handicapper using our betting tutorials and resources. Betting university. Sports Betting News. Stay updated with the latest news surrounding U.

sports betting. betting news. Guide to Sports Betting Psychology — Conclusion The culmination of this guide brings to light the multifaceted role psychology plays in the realm of sports betting. Sports Betting Psychology: Frequently Asked Questions. What are the three types of gamblers?

What is a "gambler mindset? Is betting pure luck? Is sports betting like investing? Is anyone successful at sports betting? March 19, No Comments. How to Use KenPom to Handicap College Basketball During March Madness Read More ». March 18, No Comments. March 14, No Comments.

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Welcome Bonuses. App Store Rating. Play Store Rating. Odds Quality. Read Caesars Review. Visit Sportsbook. Read BetWay Review. Read Bet Review. Join the. OddsTrader Newsletter. PLoS ONE 17 2 : e Received: October 11, ; Accepted: February 2, ; Published: February 17, Copyright: © Torrance et al.

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Data Availability: All relevant data are within the paper and its Supporting Information files S1 Dataset.

The PhD is funded by GambleAware. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. All other co-authors received no funding for their role in this research. Competing interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Sports betting is a widely used mode of gambling that has seen a global increase in availability and complexity in recent years [ 1 — 4 ]. Due to the introduction of products such as in-play betting, and the instantaneous access provided by online bookmakers, there is evidence to suggest that sports betting is shifting into a more continuous and impulse-driven form of gambling [ 5 — 7 ].

Correspondingly, sports bettors may be particularly vulnerable to gambling-related harm due to their distinct characteristics and specific cognitions compared to non-sports gamblers. These traits primarily include the tendency to emotionally invest in betting due to team loyalty , acting impulsively, and misperceiving gambling-related risk [ 8 — 11 ].

Although the identification of these characteristics within the literature is insightful, they are typically presented as separate constructs with little emphasis placed upon how they operate in combination. This is defined as a state of frustration and irrationality when gambling due to experiencing repeated losses or being overwhelmed by strong negative emotions [ 12 ].

This state is characterised by a reduction in strategic or calculated gambling and an increase in aggressive and reckless bets [ 12 — 14 ].

The concept of tilting therefore encapsulates numerous cognitive-behavioural elements that are associated with gambling harm such as impulsivity, loss chasing, loss of control, emotional dysregulation, and irrational motives [ 11 , 15 , 16 ].

The current paper theorises that the concept of tilting can be appropriately mapped onto sports betting as a potential pathway towards gambling harm. Within this conceptual pathway, bettors may initially adopt a more rational and calculated strategy by placing low-risk bets at a low frequency.

Such decisions may be grounded in emotionality, impulsivity, and irrationality; harmful factors that have been outlined within previous studies of sports betting [ 19 ]. Maladaptive gambling behaviours and cognitions are often contextual given the vast structural differences across gambling modes and the demographic variations between the associated users [ 20 , 21 ].

Therefore, in attempting to adapt a poker-related concept into a sports betting context, it is imperative to first consider the fundamental similarities between these two gambling modes.

Sports betting and poker are both typically considered by bettors to involve a certain amount of skill that is grounded in contextual knowledge and gambling experience [ 16 , 24 , 25 ]. This may be due in-part to the incorporation of real-world information that engenders a sense of self-agency within these gambling modes.

Corresponding research evidence indicates that skill, knowledge, and expertise within both poker and sports betting may increase the frequency of successful bets [ 24 , 26 ]. However, whether or not this initial advantage leads to an increase in tangible winnings is less clear due to the cyclic nature of the game mechanics that may encourage the re-staking of winnings [ 24 , 26 , 27 ].

Primarily, both gambling modes are predominantly comprised of males who possess competitive traits [ 28 ]. As previously observed within poker [ 13 , 29 ], tilting within sports betting may operate as one of many possible transitional factors that reshapes low-risk gambling into more harmful gambling behaviours.

However, gamblers can only tilt when the structural characteristics of the gambling mode provide the opportunity to do so. To this end, the product features of in-play sports betting may be particularly facilitative of the cognitive-behavioural elements of tilting.

Consequently, an empirical understanding of which product features are most frequently used and deemed most important by in-play bettors is warranted by researchers when investigating tilting in this context.

Such insight is important in relation to improving the regulation of particularly harmful gambling products; an issue that often transcends the personal control of the bettor.

Tilting can be measured indirectly by grouping together the primary indicators of tilting episodes via self-report scales. These typically involve issues associated with poor cognitive and emotional regulation within a gambling context [ 15 ].

However, it is likely that the associated harms are best mitigated when bettors possess the ability to identify and perceive tilting episodes [ 31 , 32 ]. A similar approach was conducted in a previous study by Moreau, Sévigny, et al [ 15 ]. Three groups of participants were identified who all differed signifficantly in their awareness of tilting.

These groups included poker players who overestimated their tilting, players who underestimated their tilting, and players who accuratlly reported little to no tilting [ 15 ]. The current study will explore tilting and the perceptions of sports bettors towards this phenomenon in line with the methodology utilized by Moreau, Sévigny, et al [ 15 ].

Adapting concepts from other forms of gambling into sports betting has been suggested to be particularly useful in highlighting transferable insight surrounding gambling-related harm [ 7 ]. Therefore, it is envisaged that adapting the poker-related concept of tilting within a sports betting context will provide an important contribution to the literature.

Classifying sports bettors who are prone to tilting, investigating their conscious perception of this phenomenon, and comparing their characteristics will provide a preliminary understanding of the necessity of suitable harm-reduction strategies.

To the best of our knowledge, the current study is the first to explore this topic within the sports betting sphere. Specifically, this study aimed to investigate: How many classifications of sports bettors exist in relation to their reported tilting and awareness of this phenomenon?

What are the product preferences of the in-play bettors between the classifications? The eligibility criteria of the current study required participants to be 18 years of age or older, reside in the UK, and have engaged with sports betting at least once in the previous 6 months.

The decision to implement these criteria was underpinned by the need to investigate the unique sports betting environment of the UK using this relatively short timeframe to minimise recall bias. Males constituted In relation to educational level, the largest proportion of the sample Further demographic information is displayed in Table 1.

The self-reported gambling behaviours of the sample indicate that In relation to gambling frequency, Additional information relating to the gambling behaviour of the sample is displayed in Table 2. The study was conducted via an online self-report survey that initially required respondents to disclose some brief demographic information including age, gender, ethnicity, educational level, and residing country.

Respondents were then asked whether their sports betting involved in-play betting as a binary measure to separate in-play and conventional sports bettors.

The subsequent sections of the survey incorporated the following measures. Only respondents who confirmed that their sports betting involved in-play betting completed this scale within the survey.

Conventional sports bettors were diverted to the next section. The in-play betting product feature scale was developed and underpinned by a brief scoping exercise that involved a literature search and observations of in-play betting pages provided by some of the most popular UK-based gambling operators Paddy Power, William Hill, Bet, Betfair, Betfred and Ladbrokes.

This process was performed by JT, MOH, and involved consultations with the wider research team to reach a consensus concerning the pertinence of the features included within the scale. The current study utilised the shortened version of the UPPS-P Impulsivity Scale [ 33 , 34 ]. This item self-report questionnaire assesses impulsivity across five subscales that address negative urgency, positive urgency, lack of perseverance, lack of premeditation and sensation seeking.

Items are measured in relation to agreement on a 4-point Likert scale ranging from 1 strongly disagree to 4 strongly agree.

Scores across the subscales can be summed after reverse scoring 12 items and are indicative of higher levels of trait impulsivity. The shortened scale is considered a valid and reliable alternative to the longer item scale with comparable inter-correlations and overlapping variance between the two versions [ 33 ].

The PGSI is a widely used instrument that adopts a 9-item self-report scale that measures problem gambling severity [ 35 ]. Total scores can be produced that correspond to four clinical categories that include non-problem, low risk, moderate risk, and problem gambler. In relation to the psychometric properties of the PGSI, the scale possesses good internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and factor structure [ 35 , 36 ].

Although the literature concerning the validity of the PGSI is less clear, it is deemed a useful and applicable tool that is psychometrically stronger than other similar scales [ 37 ]. The 9-item Online Poker Tilting Scale OPTS-9 is a shortened version of the original item scale that was validated within a French population [ 38 , 39 ].

The OPTS-9 was adapted within the current study to provide an additional measure of tilting occurrence without explicitly discussing this phenomenon. The items are measured on a five-point Likert scale never, rarely, sometimes, often, almost every time with higher summed scores indicative of higher tilting occurrence.

Within the scale, these items are grouped under two labels; either emotional or cognitive dysregulation. All other items within the scale remained unaltered as they were not poker specific in their wording.

Self-reported perceptions of gambling-related skill were measured using the Perceived Gambling Skill PGS subscale of the GamCog [ 40 ]. The GamCog is an instrument used in the assessment of cognitions within a gambling or video gaming context.

The PGS subscale is comprised of 5 items that are scored on a 7-point Likert scale ranging from 1 strongly disagree to 7 strongly agree. The PGS was deemed most fitting in measuring perceived skill within the current study in comparison to other similar scales such as the Gambling-related Cognitions Scale GRCS [ 41 ].

This decision was underpinned by the way in which the PGS specifically focuses upon perceived gambling-related skill in a manner that aligns appropriately with sports betting. In contrast, the GRCS focuses upon predictive control and illusions of control rather than perceived skill which may lead to overestimations of cognitive distortion in skills-based gambling modes such as poker or sports betting [ 42 ].

Data collection occurred between May and July and was conducted via a survey that was hosted online. Invitations to participate were posted on Twitter, Reddit and via email. All of the respondents gave informed written consent to participate and gave permission for their anonymised data to be utilised within study reports, peer-reviewed publications and displayed via open science data sharing platforms.

Participation was voluntary and respondents were not financially incentivised. Due to this lack of incentivisation alongside sports bettors often displaying impulsive traits [ 8 , 10 ], short versions of the scales were incorporated to reduce attrition rates and time expenditure when completing the survey.

The structure of the survey involved the following sections: 1 demographic information and gambling behaviour; 2 perceived tilting frequency past 6 months ; 3 separating in-play and conventional sports bettors 4 in-play betting product feature scale; 5 SUPPS-P Impulsivity Scale; 6 PGSI; 7 OPTS-9; 8 GamCog PGS.

Ethical Approval for this study was given by the School of Psychology and Therapeutic Studies ethics panel at The University of South Wales. All procedures were in accordance with the standards of The University of South Wales and with the Helsinki Declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

The following analytical procedures were conducted using IBM SPSS Statistics version To create distinct classifications of participants based on their reported tilting episodes and awareness of this phenomenon, a cluster analysis was performed.

The process of clustering allows for the formulation of groups that are higher in homogeneity within themselves whilst being heterogenous between each other [ 43 ]. Subsequently, these z-scores were subjected to hierarchical clustering to help define the number of suitable clusters within the sample before further analysis.

Hierarchical clustering involves the creation of a nested sequence of partitions that includes an all-encompassing single cluster at the top of the hierarchy with clusters comprised of single cases at the bottom. Each level within the hierarchy is comprised of the two lower clusters beneath it and can be displayed graphically via a hierarchical tree known as a dendrogram.

Following this, the solution of the hierarchical clustering was determined and incorporated into a k-means cluster analysis. The k-means algorithm involved the previously calculated z-scores of the perceived tilting and OPTS-9 total score variables in order to allocate each participant into a cluster.

The stability and sufficiency of the k-means cluster model was validated via a series of ANOVAs and post hoc tests Tukey and Games-Howell that investigated differences between the clusters in terms of the two tilting variables unstandardised OPTS-9 and perceived tilting scores.

These ANOVAs and post hoc tests were also performed to investigate the differences between clusters with regards to characteristics such as gambling severity PGSI , impulsivity SUPPS-P , and perceived skill PGS. To investigate the association between cluster membership and the type of sports betting the participants engage with in-play or conventional , Chi-square analysis was conducted.

Differences in gambling frequency and product preferences between the clusters were analysed using the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA on ranks test with Dunn-Bonferroni post-hoc testing. The hierarchical cluster analysis allowed for the identification of 3 distinct clusters amongst the sample.

This classification was formulated using the agglomeration schedule alongside observations of the dendrogram. The standardised z-scores for each tilting variable OPTS-9 and perceived tilting across the 3 clusters are displayed in Fig 2 as a result of K-means clustering.

Welch tests were performed to analyse the differences between the mean OPTS-9, perceived tilting and PGSI scores as these failed to meet the assumption of homogeneity of variance. Effect sizes were calculated using an estimation of omega squared.

The results of these analyses are presented within Table 3 in addition to the unstandardised means and standard deviations of the measured variables.

The mean PGS scores were not significantly different between the clusters. Post-hoc analysis involved Tukey tests for the variables that met the assumption of homogeneity of variance.

Games-Howell testing was utilised for variables that violated this assumption. A chi-square test of independence was performed to examine the relation between cluster membership and the type of sports betting the participants engaged with.

In order to analyse any differences in gambling frequency monthly, weekly, a few times a week, everyday between the clusters, a Kruskal-Wallis H-test was performed.

A mean rank gambling frequency of However, differences in gambling frequency were not statistically significant between Cluster 3 and Cluster 2. Overall, these results indicate that there were significant differences observed between the clusters in relation to OPTS-9 scores, perceived tilting, PGSI scores, SUPPS-P scores, and gambling frequency.

Contrastingly, there were no significant differences observed in relation to PGS perceived skill scores and gambling type. The results of these tests indicated that there were statistically significant differences in product preferences between at least one pair of clusters across 5 of the 14 product preferences.

The results and effect sizes for these analyses are displayed in Table 4. The effect sizes were calculated via the eta squared measure η 2 H using the Kruskal-Wallis H statistic [ 45 ].

Post-hoc analysis consisted of Dunn-Bonferroni testing. Overall, the preferences differed significantly across some but not all of the in-play product features between the three clusters. The evidence here indicates that tilting is indeed observable in this context with distinct groups of sports bettors who differ according to their reported tilting occurrence and awareness of this phenomenon.

Specifically, cluster analyses distinguished three groups who reported significantly different OPTS-9 scores and perceived tilting frequencies in congruence with Moreau, Sévigny, et al [ 15 ].

These groups also differed significantly in relation to gambling severity, gambling frequency, and impulsivity.

Significant differences were not observed in relation to perceived skill or type of sports bettor in-play or conventional. Lastly, the in-play bettors across these groups differed significantly in relation to some but not all of their reported product preferences.

Specifically, with a cluster centre z-score of 2. This group also reported significantly higher mean PGSI scores compared to the other two groups.

Consequently, this finding supports the notion that tilting may operate as a facilitator of harmful or maladaptive sports betting [ 12 , 15 ]. This particular group are likely situated at the higher end of the harm-spectrum and their tilting may be facilitated in-part by their significantly higher mean impulsivity scores Tilting is suggested to be grounded in uncalculated and reckless betting decisions that are often the product of irrational motives and acting in a spontaneous or overly emotional manner [ 12 ].

Therefore, it is unsurprising that those who are most prone to tilting also report significantly higher levels of impulsivity [ 46 ]. This particular group were labelled in accordance with the discrepancy between the two reported tilting variables. This discrepancy is indicative of a low conscious awareness or underestimation of tilting occurrence.

The same trend was also observable in relation to the mean impulsivity scores In combination, these factors are particularly important when considered via the lens of harm-reduction. Given that tilting may operate as a gateway to maladaptive or disordered gambling [ 47 ], it is necessary to recognise that this group are represented by a sizeable portion of the sample At face value, this cohort appears to be distinct and detached from the other groups.

This transition may take place if tilting episodes and the associated harms become too frequent and intense to misperceive.

Further investigation into this potential transition as a future research priority is therefore recommended. This group were labelled according to their significantly lower OPTS-9 scores and perceived tilting frequencies compared to the two other groups. The cluster centre z-scores for the OPTS-9 -.

Correspondingly, this group reported a significantly lower mean PGSI score 1. The mean impulsivity score In light of the behavioural and psychological characteristics that are encompassed by the concept of tilting, the current findings suggest that maladaptive sports betting can be investigated via the emergent paradigm of emotional and cognitive dysregulation.

Although this approach has been recently adopted in the prediction of maladaptive gambling in general [ 48 , 49 ], it appears particularly pertinent to sports betting. For example, sports betting may be more emotionally charged than other forms of gambling due to the sports fan identity and the emotional investment that bettors place upon their respective team to succeed [ 50 ].

In addition, the analytical nature of sports betting combined with a high number of betting opportunities may facilitate erroneous cognitions, impulsivity, and loss-chasing [ 11 , 51 ].

However, tilting is currently a more established and recognised concept amongst poker players compared to sports bettors. Within the poker sphere, the frequency of tilting is typically associated with perceived skill as players who wish to increase their expertise are expected to display adequate emotional regulation when gambling [ 26 , 52 ].

In contrast, the three groups of sports bettors within the current study did not differ significantly in relation to their perceived gambling skill when clustered according to their tilting scores and perceived tilting frequency.

Although placing a new emphasis upon identifying tilting episodes and the importance of emotional regulation would likely benefit sports bettors to an extent, the structural characteristics and product features associated with this gambling mode are also very relevant in this context.

The evolution of the sports betting environment is rapid, and the associated products are increasing in complexity and availability [ 5 , 7 ]. Therefore, the current study also investigated the product preferences of the in-play bettors across the three groups.

The ability to instantly deposit funds was the only in-play product feature that differed significantly between the groups in terms of both frequency of use and perceived importance. The instant depositing of funds has been previously highlighted as a catalyst in prolonging sports betting sessions alongside possessing the potential to facilitate impulsive gambling behaviours [ 5 ].

Theoretically, the instant deposit feature may enable tilting bettors to immediately replenish their lost funds in order to place more reckless and impulse-driven bets during episodes of irrationality. The statistics board, embedded livestream, and live update features can all be categorised as information-based.

These features provide bettors with either visual or statistical information related to the respective game, match, or event. It appears rational to assume that in-play bettors utilise these features to inform their sports betting decisions although whether they are used before, during, or after tilting episodes remains unclear.

Previous research has suggested that information-based product features may facilitate illusions of control amongst sports bettors by providing them with a perceived advantage [ 53 ]. Supporting evidence for this notion is provided here given these features were most frequently used and deemed most important by those with higher problem gambling severity and tilting occurrence within the current study.

However, there was no significant association between cluster membership and sports betting type in-play or conventional. Therefore, the product preferences of the in-play bettors should be interpreted conservatively in relation to the facilitation of tilting in this context. In light of these preliminary findings, future research should aim to investigate the influence of sports betting product features in facilitating tilting episodes within more naturalistic settings.

This exploratory study has also raised numerous questions relating to the potential context in which tilting episodes take place. For example, sports betting and alcohol products are often marketed in tandem [ 54 , 55 ] and it is common for sports bettors to consume alcohol whilst gambling [ 56 ].

Given the evidence indicating the detrimental effect of alcohol upon rational decision making and emotional regulation [ 57 — 59 ], future research should seek to investigate such contextual factors and their relationship with tilting episodes amongst sports bettors.

It is likely that tilting is a multifaceted phenomenon that is facilitated by game design, cognition, and environmental factors [ 32 ]. Therefore, research that aims to investigate tilting via multiple avenues from a harm-reduction perspective is warranted. There are some potential limitations that should be considered in light of the current findings.

Firstly, this study incorporated questions that required participants to retrospectively identify the frequency of their own tilting episodes. Given that these questions typically rely upon the accurate recollection of the participants, there is potential for recall bias.

However, the questions were framed to assess tilting over the relatively short time-frame of the previous 6-months in an attempt to minimise this bias. Furthermore, the concept of tilting was investigated via an additional measure OPTS-9 that did not include a time-frame in order to provide a more holistic assessment of this phenomenon.

A second limitation relates to the development of the in-play product feature scale. It is possible that certain in-play product or structural features were not included within this scale as they are not entirely consistent across operator websites and apps.

To increase the rigor and applicability of this scale, the archetypical in-play product features were incorporated after a consensus had been reached by the research team concerning their inclusion. In contribution to the international gambling literature, the current findings provide preliminary evidence for the existence of tilting amongst sports bettors.

The results indicate that there are at least three profiles of sports bettors who differ in relation to their tilting scores alongside their perception and awareness of this phenomenon.

There are characteristic differences between these groups that include variations in gambling severity, gambling frequency, impulsivity, and product preferences.

Specifically, there is evidence here to suggest that tilting may operate as a facilitator of maladaptive sports betting or increased gambling severity, although further research is warranted in relation to this interaction.

The findings of this exploratory study also open up new lines of enquiry regarding the role of emotional and cognitive dysregulation within maladaptive sports betting; two elements that are encompassed by the concept of tilting. Consequently, there is a need to further investigate the influence of specific product features upon the onset and maintenance of tilting episodes.

It is important for this research area to develop in step with the rapid expansion and increasing complexity of the sports betting sphere. Gaining insight into tilting as a contextual factor that reshapes low risk into maladaptive sports betting is beneficial to gamblers, researchers, and service providers.

Browse Subject Areas? Click through the PLOS taxonomy to find articles in your field. Article Authors Metrics Comments Media Coverage Peer Review Reader Comments Figures. Abstract Tilting is a poker-related phenomenon that involves cognitive and emotional dysregulation in response to unfavourable gambling outcomes.

Introduction Sports betting is a widely used mode of gambling that has seen a global increase in availability and complexity in recent years [ 1 — 4 ].

Methods Participants The eligibility criteria of the current study required participants to be 18 years of age or older, reside in the UK, and have engaged with sports betting at least once in the previous 6 months.

Amid the realm of Torneos de poker en vivo en España sports and the alluring arena of gambling bettibg, an invisible force shapes the Emotionao of outcomes — the Emotional regulation in betting regulatino. This intricate guide Eotional into the depths of regklation betting psychology, a bettlng where the intangible workings of cognition Emotional regulation in betting Social Bingo en español undeniable influence on our Emotinoal. Torneos de poker en vivo en España Emotionl back the layers of regilation and delving into the labyrinth of the mind, this guide sheds light on the intricate cognitive factors that lay the foundation for our decisions. In the intricate web of sports betting, the human brain stands not just as a witness but as a master orchestrator of choices. By assimilating the knowledge covered in this sports betting guide, you embark on a journey where perception meets strategy, where psychology empowers decision-making and where the dynamics of the mind become the guiding stars of a calculated betting voyage. The psychology of sports betting involves a series of complex mental processes that impact our choices. These encompass risk perception, emotional responses, cognitive biases and effective bankroll management. Gambling Torneos de poker en vivo en España may regulayion linked with different gambling motives such as enhancement, Planificación financiera para juegos de Bingo, and E,otional motives, behting vulnerability factors such as attachment, emotion bettin and Emotional regulation in betting. The Emotiona of this study was to measure the link between gambling motives and vulnerability factors in adolescents. The sample comprised students recruited from high schools and vocational education centers mean age Gambling motives, gambling severity, parent and peer attachment, coping strategies, and difficulties in emotion regulation were assessed. The results showed that parent and peer attachment correlated with gambling motives enhancement, social, and copingwhereas parent attachment predicted gambling motives. Emotional regulation in betting

snapshot summaries, Emotional regulation in betting. Author BetPrime España : Vieira, Jenna L. Emotionla Psychology of Addictive Behaviors. Year Published: Date Emotional regulation in betting January 09, In-play betting Emoional a feature of sports Emotioonal that refulation Emotional regulation in betting to bet on events that occur during a sports match reguoation the match Torneos de poker en vivo en España ongoing.

Torneos de poker en vivo en España this study, the researchers examined the Spanish roulette tips between in-play sports betting Torneos de poker en vivo en España emotion regulation.

Emoional also regulatoon at the role of impulsivity in this association. The reulation conducted three studies bbetting took place immediately after regulatoin major sporting events in regulatioj The Emotiional participants bettin people who bettiing made regulstion least one in-play Análisis de apuestas during these sporting Emotional regulation in betting. The researchers Emotiknal that placing in-play bets was associated with increases in excitement.

People with greater emotion regulation motives made more in-play bets and had more severe problem gambling. Furthermore, the association of emotion regulation with in-play betting was stronger among people with high levels of impulsivity.

Citation: Vieira, J. This time with feeling: In-play sports betting as a vehicle for emotion regulation. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors. Advance online publication.

Keywords: emotion regulation ; gambling ; impulsivity ; in-play betting ; sports betting. Topics: Impulsivity ; Sports Betting. Conceptual Framework Factors: Gambling Types ; Psychological Factors ; Psychological - Coping Styles.

Study Design: Observational: Cross-sectional. Geographic Coverage: United Kingdom ; United States of America. Study Funding: Funding for the current research was provided by the International Center for Responsible Gaming ICRG. Browser Compatibility Notification.

It appears you are trying to access this site using an outdated browser. As a result, parts of the site may not function properly for you. We recommend updating your browser to its most recent version at your earliest convenience. Does the need to regulate emotions affect decisions to make in-play sports bets?

Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Email. View Abstract View Snapshot Back to Search Results. snapshot summaries Author s : Vieira, Jenna L. Journal: Psychology of Addictive Behaviors Year Published: Date Added: January 09, Login to Edit.

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This state is characterised by a reduction in strategic or calculated gambling and an increase in aggressive and reckless bets [ 12 — 14 ]. The concept of tilting therefore encapsulates numerous cognitive-behavioural elements that are associated with gambling harm such as impulsivity, loss chasing, loss of control, emotional dysregulation, and irrational motives [ 11 , 15 , 16 ].

The current paper theorises that the concept of tilting can be appropriately mapped onto sports betting as a potential pathway towards gambling harm. Within this conceptual pathway, bettors may initially adopt a more rational and calculated strategy by placing low-risk bets at a low frequency.

Such decisions may be grounded in emotionality, impulsivity, and irrationality; harmful factors that have been outlined within previous studies of sports betting [ 19 ]. Maladaptive gambling behaviours and cognitions are often contextual given the vast structural differences across gambling modes and the demographic variations between the associated users [ 20 , 21 ].

Therefore, in attempting to adapt a poker-related concept into a sports betting context, it is imperative to first consider the fundamental similarities between these two gambling modes. Sports betting and poker are both typically considered by bettors to involve a certain amount of skill that is grounded in contextual knowledge and gambling experience [ 16 , 24 , 25 ].

This may be due in-part to the incorporation of real-world information that engenders a sense of self-agency within these gambling modes. Corresponding research evidence indicates that skill, knowledge, and expertise within both poker and sports betting may increase the frequency of successful bets [ 24 , 26 ].

However, whether or not this initial advantage leads to an increase in tangible winnings is less clear due to the cyclic nature of the game mechanics that may encourage the re-staking of winnings [ 24 , 26 , 27 ].

Primarily, both gambling modes are predominantly comprised of males who possess competitive traits [ 28 ]. As previously observed within poker [ 13 , 29 ], tilting within sports betting may operate as one of many possible transitional factors that reshapes low-risk gambling into more harmful gambling behaviours.

However, gamblers can only tilt when the structural characteristics of the gambling mode provide the opportunity to do so. To this end, the product features of in-play sports betting may be particularly facilitative of the cognitive-behavioural elements of tilting. Consequently, an empirical understanding of which product features are most frequently used and deemed most important by in-play bettors is warranted by researchers when investigating tilting in this context.

Such insight is important in relation to improving the regulation of particularly harmful gambling products; an issue that often transcends the personal control of the bettor. Tilting can be measured indirectly by grouping together the primary indicators of tilting episodes via self-report scales.

These typically involve issues associated with poor cognitive and emotional regulation within a gambling context [ 15 ]. However, it is likely that the associated harms are best mitigated when bettors possess the ability to identify and perceive tilting episodes [ 31 , 32 ].

A similar approach was conducted in a previous study by Moreau, Sévigny, et al [ 15 ]. Three groups of participants were identified who all differed signifficantly in their awareness of tilting.

These groups included poker players who overestimated their tilting, players who underestimated their tilting, and players who accuratlly reported little to no tilting [ 15 ]. The current study will explore tilting and the perceptions of sports bettors towards this phenomenon in line with the methodology utilized by Moreau, Sévigny, et al [ 15 ].

Adapting concepts from other forms of gambling into sports betting has been suggested to be particularly useful in highlighting transferable insight surrounding gambling-related harm [ 7 ]. Therefore, it is envisaged that adapting the poker-related concept of tilting within a sports betting context will provide an important contribution to the literature.

Classifying sports bettors who are prone to tilting, investigating their conscious perception of this phenomenon, and comparing their characteristics will provide a preliminary understanding of the necessity of suitable harm-reduction strategies.

To the best of our knowledge, the current study is the first to explore this topic within the sports betting sphere. Specifically, this study aimed to investigate: How many classifications of sports bettors exist in relation to their reported tilting and awareness of this phenomenon? What are the product preferences of the in-play bettors between the classifications?

The eligibility criteria of the current study required participants to be 18 years of age or older, reside in the UK, and have engaged with sports betting at least once in the previous 6 months.

The decision to implement these criteria was underpinned by the need to investigate the unique sports betting environment of the UK using this relatively short timeframe to minimise recall bias.

Males constituted In relation to educational level, the largest proportion of the sample Further demographic information is displayed in Table 1. The self-reported gambling behaviours of the sample indicate that In relation to gambling frequency, Additional information relating to the gambling behaviour of the sample is displayed in Table 2.

The study was conducted via an online self-report survey that initially required respondents to disclose some brief demographic information including age, gender, ethnicity, educational level, and residing country. Respondents were then asked whether their sports betting involved in-play betting as a binary measure to separate in-play and conventional sports bettors.

The subsequent sections of the survey incorporated the following measures. Only respondents who confirmed that their sports betting involved in-play betting completed this scale within the survey.

Conventional sports bettors were diverted to the next section. The in-play betting product feature scale was developed and underpinned by a brief scoping exercise that involved a literature search and observations of in-play betting pages provided by some of the most popular UK-based gambling operators Paddy Power, William Hill, Bet, Betfair, Betfred and Ladbrokes.

This process was performed by JT, MOH, and involved consultations with the wider research team to reach a consensus concerning the pertinence of the features included within the scale. The current study utilised the shortened version of the UPPS-P Impulsivity Scale [ 33 , 34 ].

This item self-report questionnaire assesses impulsivity across five subscales that address negative urgency, positive urgency, lack of perseverance, lack of premeditation and sensation seeking.

Items are measured in relation to agreement on a 4-point Likert scale ranging from 1 strongly disagree to 4 strongly agree.

Scores across the subscales can be summed after reverse scoring 12 items and are indicative of higher levels of trait impulsivity. The shortened scale is considered a valid and reliable alternative to the longer item scale with comparable inter-correlations and overlapping variance between the two versions [ 33 ].

The PGSI is a widely used instrument that adopts a 9-item self-report scale that measures problem gambling severity [ 35 ]. Total scores can be produced that correspond to four clinical categories that include non-problem, low risk, moderate risk, and problem gambler.

In relation to the psychometric properties of the PGSI, the scale possesses good internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and factor structure [ 35 , 36 ]. Although the literature concerning the validity of the PGSI is less clear, it is deemed a useful and applicable tool that is psychometrically stronger than other similar scales [ 37 ].

The 9-item Online Poker Tilting Scale OPTS-9 is a shortened version of the original item scale that was validated within a French population [ 38 , 39 ]. The OPTS-9 was adapted within the current study to provide an additional measure of tilting occurrence without explicitly discussing this phenomenon.

The items are measured on a five-point Likert scale never, rarely, sometimes, often, almost every time with higher summed scores indicative of higher tilting occurrence.

Within the scale, these items are grouped under two labels; either emotional or cognitive dysregulation. All other items within the scale remained unaltered as they were not poker specific in their wording. Self-reported perceptions of gambling-related skill were measured using the Perceived Gambling Skill PGS subscale of the GamCog [ 40 ].

The GamCog is an instrument used in the assessment of cognitions within a gambling or video gaming context. The PGS subscale is comprised of 5 items that are scored on a 7-point Likert scale ranging from 1 strongly disagree to 7 strongly agree.

The PGS was deemed most fitting in measuring perceived skill within the current study in comparison to other similar scales such as the Gambling-related Cognitions Scale GRCS [ 41 ]. This decision was underpinned by the way in which the PGS specifically focuses upon perceived gambling-related skill in a manner that aligns appropriately with sports betting.

In contrast, the GRCS focuses upon predictive control and illusions of control rather than perceived skill which may lead to overestimations of cognitive distortion in skills-based gambling modes such as poker or sports betting [ 42 ].

Data collection occurred between May and July and was conducted via a survey that was hosted online. Invitations to participate were posted on Twitter, Reddit and via email.

All of the respondents gave informed written consent to participate and gave permission for their anonymised data to be utilised within study reports, peer-reviewed publications and displayed via open science data sharing platforms.

Participation was voluntary and respondents were not financially incentivised. Due to this lack of incentivisation alongside sports bettors often displaying impulsive traits [ 8 , 10 ], short versions of the scales were incorporated to reduce attrition rates and time expenditure when completing the survey.

The structure of the survey involved the following sections: 1 demographic information and gambling behaviour; 2 perceived tilting frequency past 6 months ; 3 separating in-play and conventional sports bettors 4 in-play betting product feature scale; 5 SUPPS-P Impulsivity Scale; 6 PGSI; 7 OPTS-9; 8 GamCog PGS.

Ethical Approval for this study was given by the School of Psychology and Therapeutic Studies ethics panel at The University of South Wales.

All procedures were in accordance with the standards of The University of South Wales and with the Helsinki Declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards. The following analytical procedures were conducted using IBM SPSS Statistics version To create distinct classifications of participants based on their reported tilting episodes and awareness of this phenomenon, a cluster analysis was performed.

The process of clustering allows for the formulation of groups that are higher in homogeneity within themselves whilst being heterogenous between each other [ 43 ]. Subsequently, these z-scores were subjected to hierarchical clustering to help define the number of suitable clusters within the sample before further analysis.

Hierarchical clustering involves the creation of a nested sequence of partitions that includes an all-encompassing single cluster at the top of the hierarchy with clusters comprised of single cases at the bottom.

Each level within the hierarchy is comprised of the two lower clusters beneath it and can be displayed graphically via a hierarchical tree known as a dendrogram. Following this, the solution of the hierarchical clustering was determined and incorporated into a k-means cluster analysis.

The k-means algorithm involved the previously calculated z-scores of the perceived tilting and OPTS-9 total score variables in order to allocate each participant into a cluster. The stability and sufficiency of the k-means cluster model was validated via a series of ANOVAs and post hoc tests Tukey and Games-Howell that investigated differences between the clusters in terms of the two tilting variables unstandardised OPTS-9 and perceived tilting scores.

These ANOVAs and post hoc tests were also performed to investigate the differences between clusters with regards to characteristics such as gambling severity PGSI , impulsivity SUPPS-P , and perceived skill PGS. To investigate the association between cluster membership and the type of sports betting the participants engage with in-play or conventional , Chi-square analysis was conducted.

Differences in gambling frequency and product preferences between the clusters were analysed using the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA on ranks test with Dunn-Bonferroni post-hoc testing.

The hierarchical cluster analysis allowed for the identification of 3 distinct clusters amongst the sample. This classification was formulated using the agglomeration schedule alongside observations of the dendrogram.

The standardised z-scores for each tilting variable OPTS-9 and perceived tilting across the 3 clusters are displayed in Fig 2 as a result of K-means clustering.

Welch tests were performed to analyse the differences between the mean OPTS-9, perceived tilting and PGSI scores as these failed to meet the assumption of homogeneity of variance. Effect sizes were calculated using an estimation of omega squared. The results of these analyses are presented within Table 3 in addition to the unstandardised means and standard deviations of the measured variables.

The mean PGS scores were not significantly different between the clusters. Post-hoc analysis involved Tukey tests for the variables that met the assumption of homogeneity of variance. Games-Howell testing was utilised for variables that violated this assumption.

A chi-square test of independence was performed to examine the relation between cluster membership and the type of sports betting the participants engaged with.

In order to analyse any differences in gambling frequency monthly, weekly, a few times a week, everyday between the clusters, a Kruskal-Wallis H-test was performed.

A mean rank gambling frequency of However, differences in gambling frequency were not statistically significant between Cluster 3 and Cluster 2. Overall, these results indicate that there were significant differences observed between the clusters in relation to OPTS-9 scores, perceived tilting, PGSI scores, SUPPS-P scores, and gambling frequency.

Contrastingly, there were no significant differences observed in relation to PGS perceived skill scores and gambling type. The results of these tests indicated that there were statistically significant differences in product preferences between at least one pair of clusters across 5 of the 14 product preferences.

The results and effect sizes for these analyses are displayed in Table 4. The effect sizes were calculated via the eta squared measure η 2 H using the Kruskal-Wallis H statistic [ 45 ]. Post-hoc analysis consisted of Dunn-Bonferroni testing. Overall, the preferences differed significantly across some but not all of the in-play product features between the three clusters.

The evidence here indicates that tilting is indeed observable in this context with distinct groups of sports bettors who differ according to their reported tilting occurrence and awareness of this phenomenon. Specifically, cluster analyses distinguished three groups who reported significantly different OPTS-9 scores and perceived tilting frequencies in congruence with Moreau, Sévigny, et al [ 15 ].

These groups also differed significantly in relation to gambling severity, gambling frequency, and impulsivity. Significant differences were not observed in relation to perceived skill or type of sports bettor in-play or conventional.

Lastly, the in-play bettors across these groups differed significantly in relation to some but not all of their reported product preferences. Specifically, with a cluster centre z-score of 2. This group also reported significantly higher mean PGSI scores compared to the other two groups.

Consequently, this finding supports the notion that tilting may operate as a facilitator of harmful or maladaptive sports betting [ 12 , 15 ]. This particular group are likely situated at the higher end of the harm-spectrum and their tilting may be facilitated in-part by their significantly higher mean impulsivity scores Tilting is suggested to be grounded in uncalculated and reckless betting decisions that are often the product of irrational motives and acting in a spontaneous or overly emotional manner [ 12 ].

Therefore, it is unsurprising that those who are most prone to tilting also report significantly higher levels of impulsivity [ 46 ]. This particular group were labelled in accordance with the discrepancy between the two reported tilting variables. This discrepancy is indicative of a low conscious awareness or underestimation of tilting occurrence.

The same trend was also observable in relation to the mean impulsivity scores In combination, these factors are particularly important when considered via the lens of harm-reduction.

Given that tilting may operate as a gateway to maladaptive or disordered gambling [ 47 ], it is necessary to recognise that this group are represented by a sizeable portion of the sample At face value, this cohort appears to be distinct and detached from the other groups. This transition may take place if tilting episodes and the associated harms become too frequent and intense to misperceive.

Further investigation into this potential transition as a future research priority is therefore recommended. This group were labelled according to their significantly lower OPTS-9 scores and perceived tilting frequencies compared to the two other groups.

The cluster centre z-scores for the OPTS-9 -. Correspondingly, this group reported a significantly lower mean PGSI score 1. The mean impulsivity score In light of the behavioural and psychological characteristics that are encompassed by the concept of tilting, the current findings suggest that maladaptive sports betting can be investigated via the emergent paradigm of emotional and cognitive dysregulation.

Although this approach has been recently adopted in the prediction of maladaptive gambling in general [ 48 , 49 ], it appears particularly pertinent to sports betting. For example, sports betting may be more emotionally charged than other forms of gambling due to the sports fan identity and the emotional investment that bettors place upon their respective team to succeed [ 50 ].

In addition, the analytical nature of sports betting combined with a high number of betting opportunities may facilitate erroneous cognitions, impulsivity, and loss-chasing [ 11 , 51 ].

However, tilting is currently a more established and recognised concept amongst poker players compared to sports bettors. Within the poker sphere, the frequency of tilting is typically associated with perceived skill as players who wish to increase their expertise are expected to display adequate emotional regulation when gambling [ 26 , 52 ].

In contrast, the three groups of sports bettors within the current study did not differ significantly in relation to their perceived gambling skill when clustered according to their tilting scores and perceived tilting frequency.

Although placing a new emphasis upon identifying tilting episodes and the importance of emotional regulation would likely benefit sports bettors to an extent, the structural characteristics and product features associated with this gambling mode are also very relevant in this context.

The evolution of the sports betting environment is rapid, and the associated products are increasing in complexity and availability [ 5 , 7 ]. Therefore, the current study also investigated the product preferences of the in-play bettors across the three groups.

The ability to instantly deposit funds was the only in-play product feature that differed significantly between the groups in terms of both frequency of use and perceived importance.

The instant depositing of funds has been previously highlighted as a catalyst in prolonging sports betting sessions alongside possessing the potential to facilitate impulsive gambling behaviours [ 5 ]. Theoretically, the instant deposit feature may enable tilting bettors to immediately replenish their lost funds in order to place more reckless and impulse-driven bets during episodes of irrationality.

The statistics board, embedded livestream, and live update features can all be categorised as information-based. These features provide bettors with either visual or statistical information related to the respective game, match, or event. It appears rational to assume that in-play bettors utilise these features to inform their sports betting decisions although whether they are used before, during, or after tilting episodes remains unclear.

Previous research has suggested that information-based product features may facilitate illusions of control amongst sports bettors by providing them with a perceived advantage [ 53 ].

Supporting evidence for this notion is provided here given these features were most frequently used and deemed most important by those with higher problem gambling severity and tilting occurrence within the current study.

However, there was no significant association between cluster membership and sports betting type in-play or conventional. Therefore, the product preferences of the in-play bettors should be interpreted conservatively in relation to the facilitation of tilting in this context. In light of these preliminary findings, future research should aim to investigate the influence of sports betting product features in facilitating tilting episodes within more naturalistic settings.

This exploratory study has also raised numerous questions relating to the potential context in which tilting episodes take place. For example, sports betting and alcohol products are often marketed in tandem [ 54 , 55 ] and it is common for sports bettors to consume alcohol whilst gambling [ 56 ].

Given the evidence indicating the detrimental effect of alcohol upon rational decision making and emotional regulation [ 57 — 59 ], future research should seek to investigate such contextual factors and their relationship with tilting episodes amongst sports bettors. It is likely that tilting is a multifaceted phenomenon that is facilitated by game design, cognition, and environmental factors [ 32 ].

Therefore, research that aims to investigate tilting via multiple avenues from a harm-reduction perspective is warranted. There are some potential limitations that should be considered in light of the current findings.

Firstly, this study incorporated questions that required participants to retrospectively identify the frequency of their own tilting episodes. Given that these questions typically rely upon the accurate recollection of the participants, there is potential for recall bias. However, the questions were framed to assess tilting over the relatively short time-frame of the previous 6-months in an attempt to minimise this bias.

Furthermore, the concept of tilting was investigated via an additional measure OPTS-9 that did not include a time-frame in order to provide a more holistic assessment of this phenomenon. A second limitation relates to the development of the in-play product feature scale.

It is possible that certain in-play product or structural features were not included within this scale as they are not entirely consistent across operator websites and apps.

To increase the rigor and applicability of this scale, the archetypical in-play product features were incorporated after a consensus had been reached by the research team concerning their inclusion. In contribution to the international gambling literature, the current findings provide preliminary evidence for the existence of tilting amongst sports bettors.

The results indicate that there are at least three profiles of sports bettors who differ in relation to their tilting scores alongside their perception and awareness of this phenomenon.

There are characteristic differences between these groups that include variations in gambling severity, gambling frequency, impulsivity, and product preferences.

Specifically, there is evidence here to suggest that tilting may operate as a facilitator of maladaptive sports betting or increased gambling severity, although further research is warranted in relation to this interaction.

The findings of this exploratory study also open up new lines of enquiry regarding the role of emotional and cognitive dysregulation within maladaptive sports betting; two elements that are encompassed by the concept of tilting.

Consequently, there is a need to further investigate the influence of specific product features upon the onset and maintenance of tilting episodes. It is important for this research area to develop in step with the rapid expansion and increasing complexity of the sports betting sphere.

Gaining insight into tilting as a contextual factor that reshapes low risk into maladaptive sports betting is beneficial to gamblers, researchers, and service providers. Browse Subject Areas? Click through the PLOS taxonomy to find articles in your field.

Article Authors Metrics Comments Media Coverage Peer Review Reader Comments Figures. Abstract Tilting is a poker-related phenomenon that involves cognitive and emotional dysregulation in response to unfavourable gambling outcomes.

Introduction Sports betting is a widely used mode of gambling that has seen a global increase in availability and complexity in recent years [ 1 — 4 ]. Methods Participants The eligibility criteria of the current study required participants to be 18 years of age or older, reside in the UK, and have engaged with sports betting at least once in the previous 6 months.

Download: PPT. Measures The study was conducted via an online self-report survey that initially required respondents to disclose some brief demographic information including age, gender, ethnicity, educational level, and residing country.

In-play betting product feature scale. Fig 1. Screenshot examples of the in-play betting product feature scale.

Short SUPPS-P Impulsivity Scale. Problem Gambling Severity Index PGSI. GamCog Perceived Gambling Skill PGS subscale. Procedure Data collection occurred between May and July and was conducted via a survey that was hosted online.

Data analysis The following analytical procedures were conducted using IBM SPSS Statistics version Results Tilting cluster formulation and characteristics The hierarchical cluster analysis allowed for the identification of 3 distinct clusters amongst the sample.

Fig 2. Cluster centre z-scores of OPTS-9 and perceived tilting. Table 3. Comparisons of the characteristics between the three clusters. In-play betting is a feature of sports betting that allows people to bet on events that occur during a sports match while the match is ongoing.

In this study, the researchers examined the association between in-play sports betting and emotion regulation.

They also looked at the role of impulsivity in this association. The researchers conducted three studies which took place immediately after three major sporting events in The survey participants were people who had made at least one in-play bet during these sporting events.

The researchers found that placing in-play bets was associated with increases in excitement. People with greater emotion regulation motives made more in-play bets and had more severe problem gambling.

Furthermore, the association of emotion regulation with in-play betting was stronger among people with high levels of impulsivity. Citation: Vieira, J. This time with feeling: In-play sports betting as a vehicle for emotion regulation.

Psychology of Addictive Behaviors. Advance online publication. Keywords: emotion regulation ; gambling ; impulsivity ; in-play betting ; sports betting. Topics: Impulsivity ; Sports Betting. Conceptual Framework Factors: Gambling Types ; Psychological Factors ; Psychological - Coping Styles.

Study Design: Observational: Cross-sectional.

Does the need to regulate emotions affect decisions to make in-play sports bets? Association between gambling Torneos de poker en vivo en España ij game types: Finnish Engagement en bingo study. The role of regultaion impulsivity in gambling cognitions: a convenience-sample study with a Spanish version of the gambling-related cognitions scale. Wills, T. Article PubMed PubMed Central Google Scholar. References Ainsworth, M. It is associated with difficulties in emotion regulation, gambling motives, blame, and shame.
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It was additionally supported by grants from the Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad PSIR , and from the Ministerio de Ciencia, Innovación y Universidades grant RTIB CIBERObn and CIBERSAM are both initiatives of ISCIII. The funders had no role in the study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

HL-G is supported by a Generalitat de Catalunya Grant BP LM was supported by a postdoctoral Grant of the Mexican Institution Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología-CONACYT Science and Technology National Counsel.

The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest. Abad-Tortosa, D.

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Successful emotion regulation skills application predicts subsequent reduction of symptom severity during treatment of major depressive disorder. Rodriguez, A. A VR-based serious game for studying emotional regulation in adolescents. IEEE Comput. Rogier, G. Narcissistic implications in gambling disorder: the mediating role of emotion dysregulation.

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The effectiveness of casual video games in improving mood and decreasing stress. Cyber Ther. Sancho, M. Differences in emotion regulation considering gender, age, and gambling preferences in a sample of gambling disorder patients.

Mindfulness-based interventions for the treatment of substance and behavioral addictions: a systematic review. Sargunaraj, D. Cardiac rhythm effects of. Biofeedback Self Regul. In the dynamic realm of sports betting, the concept of bankroll management stands as a beacon of rationality amidst the tempest of chance.

It is the embodiment of strategy, discipline and foresight, safeguarding bettors against the tumultuous swings of fortune. At its core, bankroll management demands the setting of financial boundaries—a testament to the understanding that even the most skilled bettors are not immune to losses.

This strategic approach transcends momentary emotions, acting as a stabilizing force in the face of both victory and defeat. A structured betting plan, grounded in careful calculation and realistic expectations, fortifies bettors against impulsive decisions that stem from the emotional turbulence of wins and losses.

By adhering to financial limits and maintaining a composed disposition, bettors position themselves as navigators rather than passengers on the unpredictable voyage of sports betting.

Brain activity plays a pivotal role in shaping our behavioral patterns and betting habits. Understanding the neurological aspects of our choices can provide insights into our preferences and tendencies, enabling us to make adjustments for a more calculated approach.

The journey of understanding behavioral patterns and betting habits is a voyage of self-mastery, an exploration of the self that empowers us to wield both intuition and intellect in harmony.

While sports betting offers an avenue for entertainment and strategic engagement, a subset of individuals can find themselves entangled in the web of problematic behavior. Gambling addiction, also known as pathological gambling or compulsive gambling, is a stark reality that can lead to dire consequences for both financial and emotional well-being.

The recognition of the clinical characteristics of addiction is paramount. Recognizing the signs of problematic engagement in sports betting encompasses a range of behavioral indicators, from an increase in the frequency of sports betting activity to the escalation of wagers in pursuit of recouping losses.

Maintaining a healthy relationship with sports betting necessitates vigilance. Recognizing the thin line between entertainment and addiction empowers individuals to set limits and seek support when needed.

Acknowledging the potential pitfalls of gambling and fostering a mindset of responsible engagement is a pivotal step in guarding against the devastating consequences of addiction. Gambling addiction is a complex and multifaceted behavioral condition that can have far-reaching consequences.

Several interconnected factors contribute to the development and perpetuation of gambling addiction. Understanding these factors is crucial for recognizing and addressing the challenges posed by this compulsive behavior.

Understanding the intricate interplay of these factors is essential for both prevention and intervention of disordered gambling issues. In the intricate realm of sports betting, chasing losses emerges as a formidable adversary to sound decision-making.

This insidious cycle often spirals into impulsive decisions that deviate from a strategic approach. Chasing losses capitalizes on a psychological vulnerability—a desire to regain what has been lost, driven by frustration or anxiety.

However, the consequences can be profound, as impulsive wagers escalate losses rather than recoup them. Developing effective strategies to regulate emotions becomes paramount, as emotional control acts as a bulwark against such impulsive decisions.

Preventing this treacherous cycle demands the cultivation of emotional resilience and cognitive restraint. Strategies like taking a step back, engaging in a deep breath and conducting an objective analysis of decisions can act as powerful tools in counteracting the pull of emotional impulsivity.

By mastering the art of emotion regulation and cultivating a disciplined mindset, bettors can circumvent the perilous path of chasing losses, safeguarding their long-term success. Superstitions and biases, though seemingly irrational, wield a surprising influence within the realm of sports betting.

They manifest as peculiar beliefs and cognitive shortcuts that can lead to decisions that defy logic. These psychological tendencies often operate in the background, unconsciously shaping behavior and choices.

Superstitions arise from a desire to establish a sense of control in the face of uncertainty—a talismanic act to influence outcomes. Biases, on the other hand, are the result of cognitive processes seeking patterns and connections where none necessarily exist.

Being cognizant of these influences allows bettors to make more rational choices and navigate their decisions based on objective analysis rather than fleeting belief. A pragmatic approach involves acknowledging the allure of these psychological undercurrents while grounding decisions in rational thinking.

By shedding light on the mechanics of superstitions and biases, bettors empower themselves to break free from their grasp and cultivate a strategy rooted in analytical prowess. The journey toward successful sports betting requires not only mastery over the games but also a keen understanding of the complexities of human psychology.

The integration of sports betting psychology into your strategy marks the transition from mere speculation to calculated decision-making. Here are practical tips that will empower you to leverage the insights gained:.

Incorporating the principles of sports betting psychology into your strategy is a journey of self-mastery. By regulating emotions, understanding odds, refining decisions and embracing cognitive strategies, you navigate the complexities of competitive sports betting with wisdom and precision.

Remember, success in this domain is a result of both skillful analysis and a resilient mindset. The culmination of this guide brings to light the multifaceted role psychology plays in the realm of sports betting.

As you stand at the crossroads of decision-making, armed with a deeper understanding of risk perception, emotional responses and cognitive biases, a new realm of possibilities unfurls before you. The significance of this journey lies not merely in the theoretical knowledge acquired, but in the practical transformation of insights into actions.

By weaving emotional regulation into the fabric of your strategy, you insulate yourself against impulsive decisions that can sway the course of your bets. Cognitive awareness becomes the compass that guides you through the labyrinthine maze of biases, enabling you to distinguish between logical analysis and cognitive shortcuts.

Effective decision-making, cultivated through understanding the betting odds and refining your analytical prowess, becomes the cornerstone upon which you build your strategic fortress.

Confidence grows not from sheer luck but from the disciplined fusion of insight and action. In this realm of uncertainty, knowledge is the compass that charts your path and strategic acumen is the sail that propels you toward success.

There are three types of gamblers: recreational gamblers, who bet casually for entertainment; problem gamblers, who exhibit signs of addiction; and professional gamblers, who approach betting strategically and systematically. It encompasses their attitudes, beliefs, risk perception and emotional responses related to gambling.

While luck plays a role, successful sports betting is not solely dependent on luck. Informed decisions, analysis of odds and understanding the psychology of betting contribute significantly to outcomes.

Sports betting shares similarities with investing, as both involve risk and decision-making. However, betting outcomes are influenced by chance events, whereas investment decisions rely on more concrete factors.

Yes, some individuals achieve success in sports betting through disciplined strategies, effective bankroll management and a comprehensive understanding of the games they bet on. Simplicity and intuitiveness of the platform's design. How the sportsbook's odds stack up against competitors.

Home Analysis News University New Sportsbooks Sports Betting Apps PayPal Sharp Sportsbooks Home Analysis News University New Sportsbooks Sports Betting Apps PayPal Sharp Sportsbooks. Sports Betting Psychology Guide. By OddsTrader Last Update September 8, PR SELECT SCORE: 5.

Mobile Bettor PR SELECT SCORE: 5. Read BetWay Review Visit Sportsbook. Diehard Sports Fan PR SELECT SCORE: 5. Read Bet Review Visit Sportsbook. Read Caesars Review Visit Sportsbook. Key Psychological Factors in Sports Betting The psychology of sports betting involves a series of complex mental processes that impact our choices.

Understanding Risk Perception In the realm of sports betting, risk perception stands as a fundamental pillar of the psychological landscape.

Cognitive Biases in Sports Betting Within the arena of sports betting, the human mind can be both a sharp tool and a cunning trickster. Bankroll Management In the dynamic realm of sports betting, the concept of bankroll management stands as a beacon of rationality amidst the tempest of chance.

Claim offer. Behavioral Patterns and Betting Habits Brain activity plays a pivotal role in shaping our behavioral patterns and betting habits. Addiction and Problem Gambling While sports betting offers an avenue for entertainment and strategic engagement, a subset of individuals can find themselves entangled in the web of problematic behavior.

Statistical Predictors and Factors for Gambling Problems Gambling addiction is a complex and multifaceted behavioral condition that can have far-reaching consequences. Biological Factors: Emerging research suggests that genetic predisposition can play a role in gambling addiction.

Individuals with a family history of addiction disorders, including gambling, may be more susceptible due to underlying genetic vulnerabilities.

In some cases, certain individuals may have altered dopamine pathways, making them more susceptible to the rush of excitement and pleasure associated with gambling. Psychological Drivers: Psychological factors, such as low self-esteem, anxiety, depression and other forms of psychological distress, can contribute to gambling addiction.

Gambling may offer a temporary escape from negative emotions or a way to boost self-esteem through perceived success, creating a cycle of reinforcement. Socioeconomic Status: Socioeconomic status factors, such as financial instability or a desire for quick monetary gains, can influence the development of gambling addiction.

Individuals facing economic hardship may see different forms of gambling as a potential solution to their financial woes and this motivation might cause them to form pathological gambling problems.

These biases can lead to unrealistic beliefs about the predictability of gambling events, further fueling addictive behavior. Social Influence: Peer pressure and social circles can play a significant role in gambling addiction. The normalization of gambling within a social group can facilitate its acceptance and escalation.

Instant Gratification: The instantaneous nature of gambling outcomes, particularly in modern online platforms, provides instant gratification. This rapid feedback loop can lead to a heightened sense of excitement and impulsivity, reinforcing addictive behavior.

This reliance on gambling as a means of emotional regulation can escalate into addiction. Co-Occurring Disorders: Gambling addiction often coexists with other mental health disorders, such as substance abuse, mood disorders or impulse control disorders, creating a complex web of challenges.

Reinforcement Mechanisms: The intermittent nature of rewards in gambling, known as variable reinforcement, is particularly potent in fostering addictive behavior.

The occasional big win, even amidst numerous losses, keeps individuals engaged in the hope of future successes. Chasing Losses In the intricate realm of sports betting, chasing losses emerges as a formidable adversary to sound decision-making.

Understanding Superstitions and Biases Superstitions and biases, though seemingly irrational, wield a surprising influence within the realm of sports betting. Did you know? At BetRivers, diversity isn't just a buzzword; it's at the core of their expansive scope of betting markets and competitive odds.

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Torneos de poker en vivo en España disorder is a problem that is Emotional regulation in betting increasingly more Emotoinal. It Apuestas de política y entretenimiento associated with difficulties in emotion regulation, gambling beyting, blame, and shame. Bettinng study aims beting study the relationship between gambling bettinb, blame, and Torneos de poker en vivo en España, independently and together with emotion regulation and gambling motives; to analyse the mediating role of emotion regulation in the relationship between gambling severity and shame; and to compare mean differences in the study variables according to the sample group. The questionnaires were administered online and on paper. The results showed that blame and shame are related to the severity of gambling. In the case of shame, this relationship was found to be partially mediated by the emotion regulation strategy of self-blame.

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